Lindee’s picks for June

Anyone who knows me knows I love books. As such, my team suggested that we borrow from Heather Reisman, CEO of Indigo, and develop a short column called “Lindee’s picks”. In this column, I’ll share books and articles about health care innovation, system change and leading health care technologies. And, if you are so inclined, feel free to share your recommendations with me on LinkedIn.

Reverse Innovation: Create Far From Home, Win Everywhere (2012)
by Vijay Govindarajan (Author), Chris Trimble (Author), Indra K. Nooyi (Foreword)

I first read this book while flying to and from Qatar. I fell in love with some of the success stories about innovation coming out of emerging markets. As someone who celebrates creativity and out of the box thinking, the writers make a compelling case for the bidirectional flow of innovation—it doesn’t only flow from developed to the developing world but vice versa as well. As someone who is often preoccupied with the scalability of a solution, I was really taken with the fact that the health care innovations described in the book, could be scaled anywhere. A very optimistic read.

The Hidden Traps in Decision Making (Harvard Business Review January 2006)
by John S. Hammond, Ralph L. Keeney and Howard Raiffa

As a CEO, I make lots of decisions. I probably ask others to make even more. I’m also someone who ruminates over decisions—especially those I deem to be poor. The types of decisions we make today—in health care and in business—are exceptionally complex. This means our brains cope using mechanisms called heuristics—rules we have established that generally work for us. The coping mechanism that interested me the most was anchoring—the habit of relying on the first piece of information one receives. This struck me because I’ve seen it in myself especially when I am pressed for time. All I can say is that the entire article enthralled me, and it didn’t just give me food for thought, but cause to pause. A valuable reference.

What Works—Creating New Value with Patients, Carers and Community (2014)
by KPMG Global Healthcare

I’ve spent my entire career in health care—sometimes serving patient groups and at others, physicians and health care providers. Having seen both sides, I believe that if we are going to be successful at transforming our health care system and providing better care, we can’t do that without involving patients and creating a community around care delivery. This piece by KPMG Global Healthcare underscores the fact that health care is lagging other industries that have long realized that involving the customer strengthens one’s value proposition, driving profits and or revenue. This comprehensive paper offers a soup to nuts approach on the ins and outs of patient-centred care making an “economic argument” for patient inclusion. For anyone contributing to health care right now—this is a must read.

Cleveland Clinic: Improving the Patient Experience (2013)
by Ananth Raman and Anita L. Tucker (Harvard Business School)

This article was recommended to me by Jeff Natlund of Output. Despite having served several patient groups early in my career, and despite believing in a sort of “patient-centred care” approach, as the CEO of company that services physicians and hospitals, it would be easy to focus on opportunities for cost containment and clinical outcomes. This are so typical in this industry. What I love about this case study is the realization that patients have choices in health care and that patient satisfaction has an impact on the cost of care. Since then I have been considering all the ways we can also impact patient engagement and satisfaction—not just to the benefit of patients but also for the physicians who serve them. As I recently discussed with Dr. Duncan Rozario from Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, it’s no longer just a matter of providing good care, patient experience matters. In my opinion, scaling of the Cleveland Clinic approach is the dream. I recommend this article to anyone who needs to be inspired or who may be struggling to understand the place for patients in health care transformation.

About the author

Lindee David

Lindee is the proud Chief Executive Officer of Joule. She is a strategic, innovative senior executive who has made a career of driving change within the health care system. Her vision is to create a movement of physician-led innovation that will result in health care improvements for physicians and their patients.

LinkedIn More Content by Lindee David
Previous
Three skills doctors need today
Three skills doctors need today

The ability to coach, communicate and collaborate well with team members can actually make a life-or-death ...

Next
Commercialization, it needn’t be a dirty word
Commercialization, it needn’t be a dirty word

Often our biggest ideas come from unlikely places. And they don’t always come before a project is conceived...

What can Joule do for you?

Find out